Plasticine defeats lava. But only if it’s placed correctly. Just one of the lessons the intrepid volcanologists for the evening took home after enjoying Rising Ape Presents… Eruption for this year’s Earth Science Week.

On Monday 9th October eight teams entered the the Mt Risuvius Volcano Observatory (read: Bristol Improv Theatre) with the goal of securing a lucrative imaginary contract to take it over. Their task? To defend the nearby town from a fiery doom, through the tried-and-tested disciplines of disaster planning and pub quiz.

quiz teams assemble for Eruption
The teams assemble

First, the teams picked a suitably volcanic name, with bonus/pity points going to Igneous Ramuses and Magma Mates. Then the quiz began in earnest. Points were awarded for knowing the Hawaiian word for poo (uli), where volcanos keep their trophies (the mantle piece) and avoiding periodic lava flows into the observatory by scrambling off the floor.

Planning the defences

After the interval, a news report announced that Mt Risivius was near to erupting. The teams then had to plan how they would spend the town’s budget on defending the population and infrastructure. Would they invest in early warning systems? Or blow it all on concrete (read: plasticine) barriers to divert the destruction?

Who could withstand the lava best?

And then it happened, ERUPTION! The teams quickly constructed their defenses on a highly accurate model of Mt Risuvius. As the washing up bubbles (read: terrifying lava) flowed to much excitement, the teams’ defenses were put to the test and buildings were spared or sacrificed. But who had made the best use of their scant resources? Who out of these eight teams of bold Monday night adventurers had done the most to save the town?

As the damage was assessed and the scores tallied, it was clear there was only one winning team: Ring of Fire! Unbelievably, in an unfair world and a negatively rigged game, they’d achieved a positive score!

The scores after round 1 and a fine selection of punny team names.

The night ended with an absorbing talk from local researcher, Ailsa Naismith of the University of Bristol. Ailsa shared stories of her travels to volcanic regions in South America and the amazing people she’d met who had made volcanoes their home. It was fascinating to hear how these people felt ownership, and even friendliness, towards their unpredictable neighbours.

We’d like to thank everyone who came to Eruption and made it such fun. Your competitiveness, creativity and commitment to the world of Mt Risuvius was truly inspiring. We hope to see you all at the next event.

Rising Ape Presents… Eruption was made possible by funding from the Geological Society as part of Earth Science Week 2017.

One comment

  1. Amazing! I wish I could have been there to experience the eruption and the planning of the defenses, plus the incredible talk at the end. I need some warning for the next event…Well done!

    Like

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