Your Choice comes to Cardiff

Your Choice chapter (1)

We’re pleased to announce that Rising Ape Presents… Your Choice is coming to Chapter Arts Centre in Cardiff on the 23rd of May!

Join us in this amazing venue to hear the stories of people involved in clinical trials and create your own story by playing as a team of researchers trying to advance our knowledge of cancer.

We’ve been working on improving the Your Choice experience for this next event so expect new elements, even if you’ve been before. To get an idea of what you’re in for, read the blog on the first performance in Bristol.

Once again, we’re excited to be collaborating with the Bristol Improv Theatre and the Cardiff Cancer Research UK Centre. Most of all, we’re excited for you to try competitive cancer research for yourself. So grab your usual pub quiz team, or join another friendly group on the night, and we’ll see you there!

Rising Ape Presents… Your Choice / Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff / 7.30pm 23.05.2016

Book tickets on the Chapter site

Cancer research and stories in unlikely places – Your Choice in Bristol

Listen below to Judys take on keeping her family and friends lighthearted

Cancer research is done all over the world. Sometimes even in Bristol’s theatres…

Back in January, a lovely audience flooded into a temporary CRUK-funded research centre in the basement of the Polish Ex-Service Mens’ Club, otherwise known as the Bristol Improv Theatre.

There, they donned white lab coats and settled down in their teams, dubbed ‘research groups’, for the evening. Some teams had come together and others were made with quick introductions to new ‘colleagues’. Everyone was there to be part of the first Rising Ape Presents… Your Choice, a night of games and theatre based on the choices people make in cancer research.

Throughout the evening there was high stakes dice rolling and tough decisions, there were moving verbatim performances of interviews with patients, there were fluffy and colourful cancerous cells. And there were even prizes.

But before all of that the new research groups sat down at their tables, got acquainted and turned to the first order of business before starting to play the game: drawing cards and finding out who in their varied team they were and what special skills they each had.

“I’m a professor, I get double points! We get points?”

“I’m an interdisciplinary researcher, I can do research in any field. Sounds awesome.”

“I’m an undergraduate… And none of the research in my hand is worth any points? That’s not fair!”

“We might need to get your research to the professor, then”

The groups were learning fast. They were then told by the disembodied, but all knowing, Voice of Progress that their task was to travel around the game board and use their limited resources to do as much research as possible. The end goal? Maximise their science reputation points to come ahead of the other teams.

A research group makes their first moves. Have they made the right choices?
A research group makes their first moves. Have they made the right choices?

Eagerly, the groups set to their task, racing to the lab spaces on the board. Once there, they were able to splurge their grant money (in the shape of shiny gems) to draw research cards, and then cross their fingers that they could roll a high enough number to allow them to acquire the treatment or benefit on the card, along with its precious science points. Would they spend their money equally on all the possible areas? Or would they focus their efforts on New Treatments, and ignore Better Understanding of Cancer? Tough choices had to be made.

“Publication rejected? Oh no, we’ve lost ten points!”

“Discard a treatment card? What should we lose? Improved Chemotherapy, or Prevention of Side Effects?”

Smarter teams made the most of the ability to meet up on the board to trade cards. Thinking tactically and collaboratively helped these teams overcome what fate had dealt them. Using each individual’s skills for the greater good was key to success and more than one team managed to put all the blame on the Undergraduate or have the Fundraiser working hard to gain gems as fast as possible from the centre of the board.

As time to use their grants ran out, the groups moved faster and faster around the board, rolling, swapping and chatting as they went. All too soon time was up: the dice fell silent, the lights dimmed and the first monologue began.

“You’re taking all that information in, ‘I’ve got cancer. I‘ve got an aggressive form of breast cancer. And now you’re giving me options? Three weeks ago I was dancing on the tables in Benidorm!’”

Listen to the clip above to hear Research Nurse Jane talk about the moment patients find out about a clinical trial.

Jane works at Velindre Cancer Centre and her story highlighted that even when a choice to be part of a trial may be logical, people have strong personal emotions that have to be taken into account.

After Jane’s monologue the research groups broke out for drinks and discussion about their experiences of the first half. Awaiting the teams in the bar was the chance to make their very own cell, not out of DNA and proteins, but from brightly coloured wool and card.

A fluffy handmade cancer cell attached to the threads of clinical trials stories disappearing into the theatre
A fluffy handmade cancer cell attached to the threads of clinical trials stories disappearing into the theatre

Everyone jumped straight to it, wrapping wool around and around like their imaginary grant funding relied on it. There were a couple of different methods available, allowing for either carefully made uniform cells to form, or fast growing scrappy blobs, calling to mind a cancerous growth. An acute scissors shortage was overcome to finish them all off and they were hung up on the threads around the theatre by tags containing peoples’ thoughts on cancer research after the first half.

After sitting down for the second half, the lights dimmed again and we heard the story of Elise, a clinical trials patient taking part in research at Velindre, and her thoughts on the choices she made.

The fact that I’d have to come in and have Herceptin anyway, well it tied in with that, because I’d have to come in every three weeks, well I might as well have the trial, because I’d be here anyway.

Listen to the clip above to hear Elise explain why being part of her trial made sense for her.

After the monologue, the research groups were faced with a completely new, red-themed board. On it were the parts of the body where cancers are most often diagnosed. The Voice of Progress again boomed through the room and introduced the rules for the second half: “Move. Kill. Diagnose.” The overall aim? To use all the research and treatment cards the teams had collected in the first half to kill as many cancer cells as possible in 20 minutes.

With each move to a space the researchers could kill cancerous cells there, but with each dice roll they diagnosed more. Who could clear out cancer from whole areas of the body, and who would be overwhelmed? The teams again had to make the most of their unique abilities, ensure they had the right cards in the hands of the right professions and coordinate their movement cleverly around the board.

Some of the teams came into their own in this round, focusing fully on their task and racking up piles of red cancer cells by the roll. With just a minute to go, the activity in the room was at fever pitch, move to a space, roll to kill, roll to diagnose. A 5 second countdown echoed around the room and then the lights dimmed for the final time, coming up on the third performance of the night: Judy, a patient in a clinical trial at Velindre.

Listen below to Judys take on keeping her family and friends lighthearted
“You can have fun through it all as well. I mean, I think you’ve got to, you know, just think positively… I mean, I’d rather people react like that than feel sorry for me. I’d rather make a joke of it, because it makes it easier for them.”

Listen to how Judy keeps her friends and family lighthearted through her clinical trial treatments.

After Judy’s story (and while the scores were totalled) the audience heard from Helen Frost, CRUK Research Engagement Manager. Her words brought home the real impact on peoples’ lives from the huge advances in cancer treatments and the central importance of clinical trials to this success. Then with the scores counted, checked, found to be wrong, and then rechecked… Finally, the first ever winners of Your Choice were announced…

To much applause, Team NRR (Not Real Researchers) were pronounced the the evening’s champions! Thanks to a dominant second round performance and a mightily impressive score of 160-odd, NRR narrowly beat their nearest rival research groups. For their efforts they picked up an entire carrier bag of prizes sourced from local CRUK shops, including snazzy branded badges and a portable version of teenage sleepover classic Twister. Understandably, they were overjoyed.

The full board of the first half. Research cards, galore!
The blue board of the first half. Research cards, galore!

So with the winners crowned, the actors’ bows taken and an evaluation form filled in by each audience member, the night came to a close. If you were there, we hope you enjoyed it.

Looking back, our aim for this project was simple to state, more challenging to pull off: Engage the audience actively with cancer research and make sure they have a good time doing it. From the start we knew we wanted the audience to hear the real stories of people involved in clinical trials and leave with an awareness of what choices are being made everyday by the thousands of people involved in cancer research, from academic researchers to patients to nurses. We felt a team-based board game, literally built around their real words, would prove a powerful way to for the audience to connect with this subject.

Making this actually happen took four months, multiple journeys to Wales, many late night Slack updates, and countless team pow-wows at Bristol’s Watershed. But, thanks to the efforts of amazing patients, dedicated CRUK staff, the lovely Bristol Improv Theatre, some truly incredible actors, and a wonderful, enthusiastic audience, happen, it did. From our own side, we have learned a huge amount from the experience, so thank you, everyone.

What’s next? Already, there are plans taking shape to take Your Choice to new places and in new directions. We’re extremely excited about what’s happening so keep an eye out for announcements here in the not-at-all-distant future. And, in the meantime, if you have any feedback thoughts on the above, or new ideas that you’d like to tell us about, drop us a comment below or email info@rising-ape.com, we’d love to hear from you.

The Rising Ape Team


Find out about the research being done at CRUK Cardiff here

See what’s coming up next at the Bristol Improv Theatre here

 

Your Choice: Stories and games following the threads of cancer clinical trials

What will you choose to do about cancer? 

Join us for an inspiring night of interactive games and verbatim theatre taking you on the journeys of patients, clinicians and researchers involved in cancer clinical trials.

cancer clinical trials bristol

Where: Bristol Improv Theatre, Bristol

When: 27th January, 7.30pm

Tickets: £5-£7 online 

Your Choice is a unique night that combines moving performances of personal clinical trial stories with challenging role play games that put you and your team in the hotseats of cancer researchers.

Rising Ape Collective, in collaboration with Cancer Research UK, have been busily gathering the stories of the people closest to clinical trials — cancer patients, researchers and nurses — so you can experience them for yourself. And there’ll be prizes!

Why do clinical trials matter?

One in two people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. Whether you develop it yourself, or it takes hold of someone close, it’s a sad reality we all must face.

But, crucially, the future is brightening all the time. Half of people diagnosed with cancer today will survive, and that’s down to the work of countless scientists, doctors and nurses who tirelessly lead the fight against cancer. But the new treatments they develop wouldn’t be possible without the patients who choose to participate in vital clinical trials.

Web banner

 

Clinical trials provide the evidence to drive forward research into treatments for cancer by discovering which therapies work best. By choosing to opt in to a trial, patients choose to further our collective knowledge of cancer, so we can beat it sooner.

Your Choice is all about celebrating the extraordinary contributions of these everyday people. Come down with your team to the Bristol Improv Theatre and discover the choices everyone is making about cancer.

Doors open at 7.30pm. Tickets are £5-£7. Follow the link below to book yours in advance:

BOOK TICKETS

Space on the night for teams will be limited so snap them up!

Rising Ape + Cancer Research UK + BIT = Something special soon…

cancer research uk rising ape event bristol

This summer Cancer Research UK Cardiff approached Rising Ape Collective and asked if we’d like to develop an immersive event based around clinical trials and patient involvement. After successful initial discussions, planning and research, we are very pleased to now start shouting about it!

In January, Rising Ape and the Bristol Improv Theatre will host an evening that gets you, our audience, right in the shoes of the people making clinical trials and cancer research happen. Like all our events it will be audience-centred and engaging as hell. But this particular subject means we get the chance to try something even more human, moving and relatable.

It can be easy to take for granted the impact cancer research has had on our world, especially if you’re lucky enough to lack personal experience of this impact. In the seventies, 1 in 4 people diagnosed with cancer died. Over the last 40 years, thanks to the work done by the people of organisations like Cancer Research UK, survival rates have doubled. This astonishing progress would not be possible without the thousands of real people, patients included, from all backgrounds who come together to make it happen through projects like clinical trials. These people continue to work together every day and it’s their contributions we want you to experience.

cancer research uk rising ape event bristol

For all it’s success, cancer research is an area that can seem every bit as complex, confusing and, let’s face it, as scary, to most of us as the diseases it’s working to understand and combat. How are new drugs discovered? Who decides what treatments patients get? How do we know what works? It may not sound like the obvious choice for the next Rising Ape Presents

But we’re excited.

We’re excited because we get to highlight the human stories behind clinical trials: the place where scientists, nurses, doctors, and (most of all) patients work together to beat cancer sooner.

We’re excited to bring together a whole medley of people, patients, performers, researchers, game makers and others, to forge new conversations and understandings in an effort to create something unique.

We’re excited to collaborate with both the Bristol Improv Theatre and Cancer Research UK to make this possible. The first is an old friend we are loving working more closely with, and the second is a renowned organisation of committed and passionate people that have given us the opportunity to push ourselves in new ways.

And we’re beyond excited for you to be a part of it, whether in Bristol or, who knows, even beyond?

So look out for production updates/creative tantrums/over-excitement here on the site and @RisingApeTweets@CRUKCardiff and www.improvtheatre.net and keep the end of January as free as Willy when he soars over that Canadian sea wall, thrashing his big tail. Rising Ape, BIT and Cancer Research UK will be waiting for you.